WTF BBH Labs?

 

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To our stomach-churning surprise, Bartle, Bogle, Hegarty has opened up a contest on Crowdspring to develop a logo for their new global innovations unit, BBH Labs. Here’s what they have to say about it.

“In exploring new approaches to creative collaboration, we post this brief well aware of the debate around the Crowdspring business model within the design community. Our interest lies in finding fresh, new creative talent efficiently. It is not in our interest to undercut existing market value design fees.”

You fuckin’ serious? The very fact that you’re running a contest means you support undercutting the market value of designers. This is a greatly respected advertising agency that has just pissed in the face of every designer on the planet by offloading their logo assignment to some shite crowdsourcing site. How many great designers are out of work right now that would have gladly taken the project? How many great designers would work on the project just because it’s for BBH? $1,500 for a logo? Shit’s sorry and it’s caused us to greatly reconsider the respect we once had for this shop.

(Thanks, Larry)

Comments

  1. paul suggett

    paul suggett April 9, 2009

    I have a few good friends who

    I have a few good friends who work at BBH London. I’m going to give them shit about it right now.

  2. Miles McIlhargie April 9, 2009

    Wow, ironic. I responded to a

    Wow, ironic. I responded to a guy’s Linkedin “vote for my crowdspring logo” post yesterday and it was his concept for BBH. I Laughed it off telling him it was a setup for study/comparo purposes and that an agency like this would never tap crapspring for an identity revamp. I can’t believe it is actually true.

  3. Dawn Putney April 9, 2009

    A gut-wrenching low in our

    A gut-wrenching low in our world of design.

    “Our interest lies in finding fresh, new creative talent efficiently” – is bullshit.

    I keep thinking smart designers will get the clue some day. But when big agencies perpetuate the culture of free design, we’re all screwed.

  4. Anonymouse April 9, 2009

    I have to disagree. The world

    I have to disagree. The world is changing and the smart money is on embracing mass-collaboration as an engine of innovation. The Internet has opened up new opportunities, which are scary to some because they threaten the established way of doing things. But they also create opportunities for those brave enough to embrace the future and figure out how to use new technologies and new resources to their advantage, create new business models that lead to the creation of wealth not he destruction of it. This is how progress works. Maybe BBH will learn something valuable from this little experiment that will lead to greater opportunities down the road. No matter what you might believe, there is one simple truth that is undeniable, those who cannot evolve are destined for extinction.

  5. The Denver Egotist April 9, 2009

    Undercutting market value for

    Undercutting market value for design is “evolving?” You’re mad.

    It entirely devalues what we do for a living. It’s like saying sweat shops are okay for making expensive clothing just because the kids are available and will take the shit pay the manufacturer gives them.

    These cheap design gangbangs are taking us backwards, not forwards.

  6. Hack D. Signer April 10, 2009

    The sale has become the art.

    The sale has become the art.

  7. getreal April 10, 2009

    get a life…. they have every

    get a life…. they have every right to source where ever they want. You are threatened and insecure in your abilities. The market will determine what’s good not your pathetic squealings for unionized-like security!

  8. Chris B. April 10, 2009

    Are you really comparing a

    Are you really comparing a 6yr old child from a 3rd world country and a 28yr old (majority) white, (majority) male from a 1st world country? The shit you guys hang your hat on sometimes…

  9. Chase April 12, 2009

    This article was written by a

    This article was written by a copywriter whose tagline is ‘Will Write For Beer’. I rest my case.

  10. larry hinkle April 13, 2009

    i didn’t write the article,

    i didn’t write the article, chase. i just saw the contest and sent it to tptb. i have written for beer, though.

  11. stumped April 15, 2009

    What about high-value work?

    What about high-value work? What if the opportunity was 40k? Fair market value with a group of professional agencies? I think the world is changing and I’m excited about it. Remember Napster?

  12. tony stone April 19, 2009

    I agree. While on the one

    I agree. While on the one hand $1500 isn’t comparatively high for a crowdsourced effort, it’s low for a logo – especially for a (sub-brand of) a successful global agency.

    Interestingly, they note the low quality of submissions; hardly a surprise. As an established creative professional, I’m not likely to enter into a gamble to win a paltry $1500. This seems to have come as a surprise to them.

    You have to wonder how the guys who were organizing this logo contest would feel if their own jobs were crowdsourced.

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