Comments

  1. AppleZ August 8, 2008

    This isn’t long copy. This

    This isn’t long copy. This doesn’t have a beginning, middle and end. This is just a staccato, repetitive series of observations.

    It’s fun. It’s men’s room appropriate. But it is not long copy.

  2. The Denver Egotist August 8, 2008

    Perhaps it doesn’t fit the

    Perhaps it doesn’t fit the technical definition. But if you’re comparing it to any ad in Archive Magazine, it’s got a lot more words. Hence, “long copy.”

  3. Cynical August 8, 2008

    If archive is your benchmark,

    If archive is your benchmark, this comment is long copy.

  4. Tusinati August 8, 2008

    I think that that the

    I think that that the public’s short attention span and unwillingness to read has been exaggerated lately. Although they target a somewhat captive audience and are quite appealing when the option is counting short curlies on the pissoir, these ads work with just good copy. (Okay some design too. But for today, let us say together, “Yay copy!”.

  5. paul suggett

    paul suggett August 8, 2008

    Yeah, I think we’re splitting

    Yeah, I think we’re splitting hairs here. There’s more copy here than you’d ever expect on a beer ad, or any other ad these days. In my opinion, which isn’t all that to most people, this is long copy. And nicely done, too.

  6. paul suggett

    paul suggett August 8, 2008

    But if we are going to

    But if we are going to analyze it, there is a definite beginning (the first three sentences) a middle (almost all the rest of the copy) and the end (last line).
    So there.

  7. larry hinkle August 8, 2008

    sure, it may not be running

    sure, it may not be running copy, but it’s so nice to see something more than a visual pun with a logo tucked in the corner.

  8. word wrangler August 8, 2008

    I’m torn on the “is this long

    I’m torn on the “is this long copy” debate. There are a lot of words here (Long Copy 1 Not Long Copy 0) but it doesn’t have a coherent flow (1-1).

    The flow it does have is pretty indicative of how the mind jumps from thought to thought when you’re using the facilities. Let’s assume this was intentional (2-1).

    Using “You” creates a sense of stating a rule. Using “You’ve” makes it an observation. The sudden switch departs from the premise the first sentence establishes. (2-2)

    My final verdict is…this should be considered long copy. However the execution needs just a little polishing for it to work smoothly. How’s that for fence straddling?

  9. Jeff August 8, 2008

    “Never eaten food in

    “Never eaten food in here”???? Come on! Sometimes nature calls at unexpected times, and a bag of Cheetos is THAT irresistible.

  10. paul suggett

    paul suggett August 8, 2008

    I do think there is some

    I do think there is some issue with that “word wrangler”, it’s a little sloppy in places, jumping from past to present tense, too. But overall, it’s fun and engaging and there’s more to read than a logo. Woot!

  11. Tom Comber August 8, 2008

    I don’t consider it long

    I don’t consider it long copy. You can pretty much remove any sentence, and it won’t be missed. Lay it out vertically, and it’s a list.

    An extended, lavatorial riff akin to Miller Lite’s “Man Rules”. I like it.

  12. justinpaluch August 8, 2008

    I think this may depend on

    I think this may depend on what you do for a living. As a designer, I say it’s long copy… or at the very least, it’s voluminous.

    Where will I fit my lens flares and page curls?

  13. paul suggett

    paul suggett August 8, 2008

    I’m not sure where this

    I’m not sure where this definition of long copy has suddenly sprang from. I’ve been a professional copywriter since ’96, in some pretty decent London shops, and no-one ever told me that long copy had to flow like prose and short copy was staccato. I have written ad copy way longer than this, I have written brochure that was shorter. Does someone have a big book of advertising lingo that I’m not aware of?

  14. justinpaluch August 8, 2008

    Definitions of long copy and

    Definitions of long copy and requirements for being an ‘ad town’ are handed down from the Angry Gods on Mount Mynneapolus.

  15. Tom Comber August 8, 2008

    Ogilvytemes, God of Long

    Ogilvytemes, God of Long Copy?

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